Tropical Plant Research

Tropical Plant Research

An International Journal by Society for Tropical Plant Research

ISSN (E): 2349-1183 ISSN (P): 2349-9265
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2020, VOLUME 7 ISSUE 3Pages: 529-540

Ensuring the effects of climate warming; the sensitivity of controlling factors on soil respiration in Sub-Tropical grassland

Deepa Dhital*, Suman Prajapati, Sanu Raja Maharjan and Toshiyuki Ohtsuka
*Faculty of Science, Nepal Academy of Science and Technology (NAST), Khumaltar, Lalitpur, Kathmandu, Nepal
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Abstract:
Prevailing climate change is expected due to carbon dioxide emission to the atmosphere through soil respiration and perhaps the alteration in the terrestrial carbon cycle. The measurements to establish the effect and sensitivity of soil temperature, soil water content and plant biomass on soil respiration was performed in the sub-tropical grassland located in Central Nepal. Field measurements of soil respiration was conducted by using the closed-chamber method, and soil temperature, soil water content and plant biomass were monitored in the years 2015 and 2016. The soil respiration showed positive significant exponential function which accounted for 74.6% (R2=0.746, p<0.05) of its variation with the soil temperature. The temperature sensitivity of soil respiration, Q10 value obtained was 2.68. Similarly, soil respiration showed a positive significant exponential function that accounted for 37.2% (R2=0.372, p<0.05) of its variation with the soil water content. Remarkable seasonal and monthly variations were observed in soil respiration, soil temperature and soil water content, and the plant biomass as well followed the seasonal trend in variation of the soil respiration. Average soil respiration during measurements period was observed 325.51 mg CO2 m-2 h-1 and the annual soil respiration of the grassland in the years 2015 and 2016 was estimated 592.35 g C m-2 y-1. The study confirmed that soil temperature is the most influential primary factor in controlling soil respiration along with the soil water content and plant biomass. This research indicates that through emissions under the increasing temperature and precipitation, in the changing climate, the sub-tropical grassland could be an additional source of carbon dioxide to the atmosphere that might spur risk for further warming.
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